FAQ

What are the members of UKIP like?

A:

UKIP is like any other party in one sense: we have a wide variety of members from all different socio-economic, ethnic and religious backgrounds. Our membership is split roughly equal between men and women and we have both a dedicated youth wing and LGBT wing. UKIP’s youngest member is 18 and our oldest over 100 years old. In addition, we have one of the highest proportions of members who are also serving or former members of the armed forces of any major political party.

What is UKIP’s key principle?

A:

First and foremost UKIP believes that the UK should be an independent nation and its politicians only answerable to the electorate here at home. We also believe that where the state is not best placed to intervene, whether it be with legislation or regulation, it shouldn’t. We believe in the principle of individual liberty and feel that the state has encroached far too much into people’s lives and the operation of businesses.

Why does UKIP not support continued membership of the European Union?

A:

UKIP believes the UK should be governed by a Parliament, wholly-elected by the people of the United Kingdom. The European Union is not a loose union of states which cooperate on matters of shared interest, but is in reality on its way to becoming the United States of Europe. This is not myth or scaremongering. The EU is underpinned by a shared commitment to ‘ever closer union’. It now as a European External Action Service, which is the EU-way of hiding the existence of an EU army. It has the makings of its own police force – Europol and its own prosecutor. It has its own central bank and foreign minister, known as the High Representative. We don’t believe that a USE, led by a Franco-German alliance with an imperialist agenda will be good for the UK’s interests or those of the wider world.

What is UKIP’s view on the economy?

A:

UKIP wants a strong economy and subscribes to the view that consumers drive economies, when freed up to spend their money as they choose. We also believe that government’s should only take what it needs from people, not what it wants, and should be responsible for how tax revenue is spent. We would like to see the development of a fiscal responsibility framework which caps government spending and prevents unnecessary borrowing.

UKIP believes we need a new tax system which is transparent and fair. We also feel that taxes should be as low as possible to motivate people to work hard and contribute to the economy.

Why does UKIP want to cut the aid budget?

A:

It doesn’t. UKIP wants existing aid programmes to remain untouched. However, we believe that ‘development’ programmes, such as paying for Ugandan boy bands to record albums needs to stop. We also want to see an end to our government giving money to countries run by corrupt regimes and countries with stronger economies than our own. We do not believe it is the role of government to borrow money to give it away to foreign governments, which we all have to pay back through our taxes (with interest).

What does UKIP criticise the third sector?

A:

UKIP believes that the British people are the most generous in the world and that we don’t need a government to tax us and give away money on our behalf. British people routinely dig deep to fund charitable causes, from Children in Need to the Samaritans, the UK is home to amazing charities which do excellent work. But, it is also home to organisations that benefit from charitable status, whilst doing little public good. These organisations are largely dependent on taxpayer money for survival and many employ managers on six-figure salaries. UKIP believes this needs to stop.

 

Why do UKIP constantly criticise the ‘political class’?

A:

UKIP believes politicians should have life experience before becoming politicians. For that reason we feel that those standing for elected office should meet a minimum age requirement and those entering political office should be term-limited. We also believe that the revolving door between the state-run media, third-sector and government is bad for democracy. If ministers are thinking about joining a charity board, or working for a bank when they leave office there is good reason to think this will influence how they act when they are ministers. We would develop strict rules to deal with this incestuous culture.

Why does UKIP have such strong support in the armed forces?

A:

UKIP believes that a government’s first responsibility is to ensure the safety and security of its people at home and abroad. UKIP feels that our armed forces, security services and police are woefully underfunded and that this needs to change. The UK was once a proud military nation, which did much good around the world. Why we don’t believe we need the world’s largest air force or navy once again, we do feel that our current lack of military infrastructure and capability puts the country at risk.

UKIP talks about the growing politicisation of policing. What does this mean?

A:

UKIP believes that most of our police officers are good people. However, their priorities and the laws they must enforce are set by politicians. Over recent decades the police have become swamped enforcing a politically-motivated and ever-expanding body of criminal law targeting free speech and family life. Meanwhile, anti-social behaviour, thefts and assaults go investigated. We want to see a full review of the criminal law to simplify it and make the job of policing more efficient.

Why does UKIP not agree with the political consensus on the NHS?

A:

UKIP believes that healthcare needs to be delivered in the most efficient and effective way. The NHS has become a political hot potato, over bloated with administrators and managers and consumed by bureaucracy. We feel that healthcare needs to be funded in a way that takes account of people’s lifestyle choices and in a way that is sustainable. We also want to see an end to the artificial divide between primary and secondary care, which only serves to increase the cost of delivering healthcare services.

What is UKIP’s view on education?

A:

UKIP believes in an education system which nurtures talent and rewards excellence. We do not believe in ‘an everyone wins a prize’ culture, which is has devalued our qualifications.

Why does UKIP deny climate change?

A:

We don’t. UKIP believes that we all benefit from a clean environment and feel it should be preserved for future generations. However, the way in which we achieve this is up for debate. Other parties choose to subscribe to the view that the best way to protect the environment is to tax business and consumers. We don’t. We feel this is short-sighted and not effective. We feel limiting immigration so that we don’t have to build on green field sites, developing reliable forms of clean energy and aiming to cut imports of food, by enabling our farms to produce cheaper food is the best way to protect the environment.

Why does UKIP condemn open-door immigration?

A:

UKIP believes the UK population cannot be allowed to grow indefinitely through uncontrolled immigration. Our cities are overcrowded, our schools oversubscribed and our hospitals overstretched. People will always be attracted to the countries with the highest wages and quality of life. That is natural and we don’t blame anyone for wanting to come to the UK. However, every person who emigrated to the UK has the potential to displace a UK citizen from a job, a house or an NHS waiting list. We believe it is sensible to limit immigration so that public services can be planned and delivered in the most effective way.